what to do along new bullet train route

107387868 1710464296350 gettyimages 554791929 6039fcb3 0093 49d6 b737 80c792867862

107387868 1710464296350 gettyimages 554791929 6039fcb3 0093 49d6 b737 80c792867862

Japan is set to debut a new high-speed bullet train extension on Saturday, making the Fukui Prefecture more accessible to travelers. Located 185 miles west of Tokyo, this coastal prefecture will be serviced by the new shinkansen, passing through Fukui City, Awara, and ending in Tsuruga, adding 78 miles to the existing Tokyo-to-Kanazawa route.

The Fukui Prefecture offers unique attractions like dinosaur fossils, Zen meditation, and hot springs, making it an ideal destination for those looking to explore off-the-beaten-path locations in Japan. The Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum in Katsuyama showcases close to 80% of Japan’s dinosaur fossils, with lifelike animatronics and interactive fossil digs for families.

Visitors can also experience Zen Buddhism at Eiheiji temple and opt for an overnight stay to engage in zazen meditation and traditional meals. Additionally, a trip to Awara offers the chance to relax in hot spring baths, partake in hands-on activities like glassblowing, and explore the Kanaz Forest of Creation for art installations and orchard-picking.

The shinkansen service concludes in Tsuruga, where travelers can visit the Kehi-no-Matsubara pine grove and the Port of Humanity Museum, which commemorates the rescue of Jewish refugees during World War II. Those interested in history can follow the footsteps of Matsuo Basho at the Kehi Jingu shrine and take express trains to Kyoto or Nagoya for further exploration.

Japan is launching a new high-speed bullet train extension that will make the under-the-radar Fukui Prefecture more accessible to travelers. The new Hokuriku Shinkansen route will add 78 miles, passing through cities like Fukui and Awara before reaching Tsuruga. Fukui is known for its dinosaur fossils, with the Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum showcasing remains and animatronics. Travelers can also explore Zen Buddhism at Eiheiji temple and enjoy traditional hot-spring baths in Awara. The route ends in Tsuruga, where travelers can visit sites like Kehi-no-Matsubara beach and the Port of Humanity Museum. The town also has historical significance, as it was a refuge for Jewish refugees during World War II and visited by the famous haiku poet Matsuo Basho. The new shinkansen service connects Tsuruga to Kyoto and Nagoya, providing easy access back to Tokyo.

Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

scroll to top